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All About THCP: A Highly Potent, Natural Cannabinoid

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As the demand for cannabis research and potent new products continues to soar, it’s becoming increasingly apparent that this plant is much more complex than we ever could have imagined. It seems like every day we’re learning something new about pot, from medical applications and innovative technologies to recently discovered cannabinoids, terpenes, and flavonoids – all with their own interesting effects and benefits.

Lately there’s a lot of talk about Tetrahydrocannabiphorol, or THCP, because it was only very recently synthesized for the first time and, according to the existing research, this THC-like compound is considerably stronger than many of the cannabinoids we’re currently familiar with.

Cannabis is full of fun and interesting compounds including HHC, all the Delta THCs, CBD, and so much more. If you would like to learn more about these cannabinoids, or try out different products make sure to Subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter to learn more and for exclusive deals on Delta 8, Delta 10 THC, THC-O, THCV, THCP & HHC.


Different ‘Types’ of THC

When we talk about tetrahydrocannabinols as a whole, we are referring to a specific chemical structure known as C21H30O2. This chemical structure is basically the umbrella under which numerous different-yet-very-similar compounds can be created. These molecules, known as isomers, have the same chemical formula but the arrangement of atoms within the molecule can vary – like how the words ‘live’ and “evil’ have the exact same letters, but once you switch up the configuration a bit, the words take on completely different meanings.

Take all the delta THC’s, for example. In Delta 9 THC, the most abundant compound in cannabis, the ‘9’ represents where the double bond occurs, in this case, on the 9th carbon atom in the chain. When the double bond moves to the 8th atom, it becomes Delta 8 THC, which is an isomer of Delta 9. The same holds true for Delta 10 THC, which is an isomer of Delta 9 with the double bond located on the 10th atom in the chain.

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The difference between Delta 8 and Delta 10 is that Delta 8 is a naturally occurring isomer formed via the oxidation of Delta 9 THC, whereas Delta 10 can only be created synthetically. And speaking of synthetics, let’s quickly discuss THC-O-Acetate. This compound is an analog of THC, meaning its chemical structure is similar to delta 9, but differs more than an isomer.

Then we have 11-hydroxy-THC, which has the chemical formula C21H30O3. Although it has ‘THC’ in the name, 11-hydroxy is not THC, nor is it an isomer or analog of THC. Rather, it is metabolite of THC and technically an endocannabinoid, created when our bodies digest other types of tetrahydrocannabinols. It has a very similar chemical structure to all THCs, but as you can see, there is one extra oxygen molecule making this a completely different compound, with similar, but reportedly much more powerful, effects.

THCP, on the other hand, is a special type of THC analog called a homolog. A homolog is a molecule belonging to a series of compounds that differ from each other by a repeating unit. In this scenario, the repeating unit is the alkyl side chain. Delta 9 THC has a 5-term alkyl side chain, which means that it contains 5 total carbon atoms. THCP has an elongated 7-term chain.

THCP: Enhancing THC’s Binding Ability

THCP is one of the newest cannabis compounds to be discovered, having first been documented in late 2019. Again, the main difference researchers found in THCP compared to Delta 9 THC is that THCP has a longer alkyl side chain, which is believed to be a vital factor in the way THCP interacts with the body’s CB1 receptors, compared to other THCs.

In organic chemistry, an alkyl is an alkane that is missing one hydrogen molecule. The term alkyl is intentionally unspecific to include many possible substitutions. Alkyls form homologous series and most of the simplest series have the same general formula.

A minimum chain length of three links is required for THC to bind with the receptors, with binding affinity peaking at eight links before starting to decrease. THCP’s seven-link chain puts it close to the maximum for receptor activity. When researchers checked THCP vs THC binding affinity with both cannabinoid receptors, they found that THCP was 33 times for active at the CB1 receptor and 5-10 times more active at CB2.

What Are The Implications of These Findings?

The main reason this discovery has everyone so excited is because researchers believe that THCP mimics the effects of THC in the body, but at a much more effective rate. Although THCP is a minor phytocannabinoid, its presence can still impact the high via the entourage effect and many in the scientific community believe it can do so more efficiently than other trace compounds.

This brings us to our next questions: as a minor compound, how much THCP is required to produce a noticeable difference in either medicinal or psychoactive effects, and exactly how much THCP is found in most strains? As much as I’d like to give an exact answer, the reality is that the research just hasn’t made it that far yet. The scientists who discovered THCP only had access to one strain, provided by the federal government of Italy, and in they found very little THCP. However, it’s worth noting this statement in the report claiming that “it is reasonable to suppose that other cannabis varieties may contain even higher percentages.”

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Other experts disagree, such as Dr. Samuel Banister from The University of Sydney, who believes the difference in effects is not that substantial. “While this possibility cannot be ruled out,” Banister stated, “the known potency differences for THC and THCP at cannabinoid receptors is relatively small, while the difference in abundance of each in cannabis is enormous. The same is true of CBD and CBDP, although CBD requires even higher doses to achieve many of its pharmacological effects. For this reason, I do not feel that minor or trace phytocannabinoids like THCP or CBDP contribute significantly to the psychoactive effects of different cannabis strains.” 

Bottom line, more research needs to be done in order to get a better idea of the full scope of THCP’s recreational and pharmaceutical potential. There is no way to put an exact number on how much stronger THCP is, or how much better it works than THC, if we don’t have repeatable research and solid data to reference to.

THCP Products… Where to Find Them, and Are They Safe?

Because so little is known about THCP, it’s impossible to say with 100 percent certainty whether it is safe or not. Because it’s a cannabis compound, one can assume that it has a relatively good safety profile. The consumer always assumes a certain level of risk when buying new, trendy, and barely-studied products, and this is true in more industries than just cannabis.

All that said, a few companies are already selling THCP products, and whenever we stumble on good-quality ones, we’ll make sure to include them in our newsletter. So far, all we’ve been able to source are vape carts and gummies, but either one is a great option if you’re interested in sampling THCP to see if this cannabinoid is right for your needs. As demand intensifies and more research becomes available, an inevitable wave of new products will hit the market.

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Conclusion

Cannabis has hundreds of different compounds, some major, some minor, some potent, some non-psychoactive. With so many restrictions in place, it’s impossible to know everything about certain cannabinoids at this point. The first discovery of an individual cannabinoid was in 1940, and THCP was just discovered less than 2 years, so it’s one of those subjects we’ll continue to learn about for a very long time. In the near future, additional information will be revealed about cannabis, giving us a more complete picture of what the plant and all of its compounds can really do.

Thank you for stopping by CBD TESTERS, your hub for all things cannabis-related. To learn more about marijuana, and for exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, and other products, make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter.

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Does Weed Make You Nicer? Cannabis Use and Prosocial Behavior

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We all know that cannabis can certainly mellow you out and make you feel happy, connected, and balanced – but does that equate to being a characteristically “nicer” person? Researchers from the University of New Mexico believe that it does.  

In a recent study titled “Cannabis Consumption and Prosociality” published on May 19th in the journal, Scientific Reports, UNM researchers found that healthy young adults with regular and recent exposure to cannabis demonstrated higher levels of prosocial behaviors, as well as a heightened sense of empathy, compared to non-users. Additionally, cannabis users scored higher on standardized measurements of moral decision-making based on the notions of being fair and not harming others. 

Cannabis research is fascinating, and we’re learning more about this, and other incredible plants, every day! To stay current on everything important happening in the cannabis and psychedelics industries, subscribe to The Cannadelics Weekly Newsletter. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


Teaching empathy  

Empathy is a key element of social interaction, and can be defined as the ability to understand and share the feelings of another person. Empathy is a building block of successful communication that enables us to better comprehend and process the emotions behind what others are telling us, and thus, allows us to form the correct responses.  

According to a meta-analysis of US citizen empathy test scores conducted over the last 30 years, our collective levels of empathy are dwindling. Based on questions pulled from the Interpersonal Reactivity Index, researchers found the levels of “empathetic concern” have been dropping sharply. They’ve been tracking this phenomenon since 1979, but noted that the most pronounced declines occurred after the year 2000. Typically, women are more empathetic than men, but that’s not always the case.  

For decades, it was believed the empathy was an inborn trait – you either had it or you didn’t. But more recent research has shown us the empathy can be taught and improved using certain therapies and training methods. The ability to have empathy hinges on various, complex psychological and physiological processes. Because of the way cannabis interacts with our bodies’ endocannabinoid system, and cannabinoid receptors are highly concentrated in regions of the brain that regulate emotion, such as the amygdala, it’s believed that cannabis can help overcome these emotional hindrances.  

“Cannabis can have an impact on a person’s ability to understand and share the feelings of others,“ explained Dr. Jan Roberts, psychotherapist and CEO of The Cannabinoid Institute, a medical cannabis education company. “But it depends on intention, type of cultivar used, and dosage,” she continued. Too little and you won’t get what you’re looking for. Too much, “and you can suppress or dull your emotions.” 

About the study  

Now, back to the aforementioned study. The research was broken down into two basic parts: testing for THC in 146 healthy university students aged 18 to 25, and providing the participants with a series of seven questions. Nearly half of the students tested positive for THC, and were aptly placed into a group together called “users”, and the rest of the students were the “non-users”.  

Researchers discovered that the “users” group scored higher in categories of “prosocial behaviors, moral fairness, moral harmlessness, and empathy quotient,”, but lower on “ingroup loyalty”. An interesting curveball here, is that female users scored higher in areas of “aggression” than non-users, whereas male users were found to be more “agreeable” than non-users.  

cannabis empathy

“Most investigations on the effects of using cannabis have focused on either negative consequences of cannabis addiction or on the physical health effects of cannabis use,” said lead investigator and Assistant Professor Jacob Miguel Vigil, UNM Department of Psychology. “Almost no formal scientific attention has been devoted to understanding other psychological and behavioral effects of consuming the plant, despite it being so widely used throughout human history.” 

Regarding other dimensions of personality, such as anger, hostility, trust of others, facial threat interpretation, extraversion, conscientiousness, emotional stability, and openness, as well as moral decision making centered on the principles of social correctness and respect for authority – no changes were noted. Researchers also found that the effects were not permanent, meaning they are almost certainly caused by the cannabis rather than being inherent personality traits in the study participants.  

“The transience of the effects supports that cannabis is triggering behavioral and perceptual changes rather than that cannabis users and non-user differ fundamentally in their baseline approaches to social interactions,” said co-author and Associate Professor Sarah Stith, UNM Department of Economics. 

“I often refer to the Cannabis plant as a super medication, relative to most other conventional pharmaceutical products, because it is not only effective for treating the symptoms of a wide range of health conditions, quickly and relatively safely, but now we have concrete evidence that it may also help improve the average person’s psychosocial health,” said Jacob Vigil, lead investigator and Assistant Professor at UNM Department of Psychology.  

“Prosociality is essential to society’s overall cohesiveness and vitality, and therefore, cannabis’ effects on our interpersonal interactions may eventually prove to be even more important to societal wellbeing than its medicinal effects,” he added.  

Research on animal models 

A second paper published the same month in the journal Neuroscience & Behavioral Reviews, titled Effects of endocannabinoid system modulation on social behaviour: A systematic review of animal studies, applied this same theory to animal subjects. In this review, researchers from University of Toronto analyzed 80 existing studies that were conducted on a variety of mammals including capuchin monkeys, rats, mice, hamsters, and gerbils.  

cannabis empathy

Above all, it was important to determine whether cannabinoids influence social behaviors and interactions in animals, like they do in humans. As it turns out, they do. In a nutshell, what the study authors discovered was that direct cannabinoid receptor agonism – achieved through “experimental administration of a range of potent synthetic cannabinoids” – decreased social behaviors in animals, while indirect [receptor] activation via “enzyme inhibition or gene-knockout” increased social behaviors. 

Simply put, cannabinoids that had firsthand interactions with the endocannabinoid system, like Delta 9 THC and other psychoactive compounds in the plant, were said to decrease social behaviors, whereas compounds that had secondhand (indirect) effects on the cannabinoid receptors, like CBD, were believed to increase social behaviors. It’s worth pointing out that, although we do share many genetic similarities with the animals from the study, there are major differences as well, especially when it comes to learned social behaviors. That could explain why direct endocannabinoid activation in humans seems more helpful in social situations, as opposed to the way it affects animals.

As the authors also note, “some research has suggested cannabis might provide some symptomatic relief for conditions involving impaired social behavior.” A growing body of evidence, both clinical and anecdotal, highlight the ability of cannabis therapies to treat anxiety and other mood disorders, which can have a profound impact on social interactions.  

Final thoughts 

Although proven effective in some cases, the general consensus is that the connection between weed and empathy, or overall “niceness”, stems from a very personalized approach to cannabis use. “Everyone is different and for people who have had more stressors or trauma in their life, they may need more CBD or CBN to affect their level of empathy,” says Dr. Jan Roberts, psychotherapist and CEO of The Cannabinoid Institute.  

“Using cannabis can get you to go beyond your ego and defense mechanisms and communicate connection, reciprocity and growth but it must be based on an individual’s mind, body and, frankly, spirit,” she added. . 

Welcome to the site! Thanks for making it to CBDtesters.co / Cannadelics.com, the top internet spot offering up fully-rounded independent news covering the growing cannabis and psychedelics industries. Stop by frequently to stay up-to-date on these dynamic industries, and make sure to sign up to The THC Weekly Newsletter, to ensure you’re never late on getting the news. 





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FDA Going After Delta-8 Companies

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It was coming. We knew it by Shopify. And whatever happened is probably just the beginning of the story. We know the government isn’t thrilled about the cannabinoid industry, and now its making its first big, direct move, by using the FDA to go after delta-8 THC companies.

The FDA going after delta-8 companies is a predictable move, but who knows how this will end. We specialize in cannabis and psychedelics reporting, which you can follow along with by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter. You’ll also get prime access to deals on an array of cannabis products like vapes, edibles, and smoking paraphernalia. Plus, we’ve got tons of cannabinoid compounds like delta-8 THC as well. Please remember, *cannabinoid compounds are not preferred by everyone. We only support people buy products they are comfortable with.


What’s the news?

The CBD industry is already aware of how much the FDA doesn’t like it. The FDA has sent out letters to tons of companies over the years, reminding them about federal laws, and to stop producing and selling products that go against them. For the most part, this hasn’t had the biggest impact, and CBD, which is now cleared for medical use by the UN via updates to the Single Convention, is found pretty much everywhere.

On May 4th, 2022, the FDA made its first big, direct move in the cannabinoid space, by sending out warning letters to delta-8 companies, warning them that the products they are producing and selling, violate federal law. Five companies were targeted thus far, but perhaps more will receive letters in the future. After all, Shopify had to remove a lot of products, and the very same vendors are the targets of such letters.

The companies targeted by the FDA for their delta-8 products, are ATLRx Inc., BioMD Plus LLC, Delta 8 Hemp, Kingdom Harvest LLC, and M Six Labs Inc. These warning letters don’t leave CBD out, making mention of the company violations on that front too. According to Jonathan Havens, co-chair of Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr’s Cannabis Law Practice and the Food and Beverage Practice, “the five warning letters represent the first enforcement actions taken by FDA against delta-8 marketers.”

delta-8 thc

Part of the issue has to do with medical claims. According to the government agency, there are no approved drugs that contain delta-8, and so using delta-8 to make any claim for a medication, means making an unapproved claim, for a drug which is also unapproved. The FDA also attacked the idea of the mis-branding of products, with the complaints of not giving good enough instructions, as well as putting delta-8 in food products.

Said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner, Janet Woodcock, “The FDA is very concerned about the growing popularity of delta-8 THC products being sold online and in stores nationwide… These products often include claims that they treat or alleviate the side effects related to a wide variety of diseases or medical disorders, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, nausea and anxiety. It is extremely troubling that some of the food products are packaged and labeled in ways that may appeal to children. We will continue to safeguard Americans’ health and safety by monitoring the marketplace and taking action when companies illegally sell products that pose a risk to public health.”

Of course, delta-8 THC has, indeed, been found useful for all the conditions mentioned, which does beg the question of why the government is trying so hard to protect its population from these compounds, especially in light of the no-death count attached. It has repeatedly been shown that additive products are the real main issue, and that cannabis compounds have yet to be associated with death. This is important because another government agency, the CDC, just requested to lower prescribing guidelines for opioids, which already kill as many as 70,000+ a year, even as other non-addictive, no death-toll measures like ketamine and cannabis, exist.

How did this come about?

This newer issue is a counterpart to the CBD issue, which has been going on for awhile now. The cannabinoid industry, led by delta-8 THC, is based on the idea of extracting cannabinoids from the hemp plant for use in products. But there’s a problem with this. Though some of the compounds can technically be extracted from hemp, like delta-8, they can only be extracted in tiny amounts, so that for product production, synthetic processes must be used. This takes these products out from under the definition of hemp, making them federally illegal.

CBD on the other hand, can be extracted in large enough quantities that the same issue of synthetics isn’t relevant. However, neither is cleared by the US federal government for internal use, and the only reason there’s a conversation, is as a result of the 2018 US Farm Bill. The bill instituted a new definition for hemp, in order to promote the industrial hemp industry. In so doing, it separated high-THC cannabis from low-THC cannabis, and defined ‘hemp’ as only certain parts of the actual plant, without including synthetics. It should be noted, however, that even though the US government says CBD is not legal in this way, it did approve epidiolex, a big-pharma synthetic version of CBD. It has also approved synthetic versions of THC (dronabinol).

Synthetics of any Schedule I substance (which are not big-pharma made and approved), are also Schedule I under the Federal Analogue Act. When compounds are made using synthetic processes, or that don’t exist in nature (delta-10), they are not covered under the definition of hemp. Nor is anything (plant or product) that has over .3% delta-9 THC.

hemp

Two of the many issues with the cannabinoid market, are that large amounts of delta-9 THC are often found in products, and that synthetic processing is used to make them. Though the industry uses the term ‘hemp-derived’, this only means that some aspect of it came from the hemp plant, although in reality, even this isn’t necessarily true. As the industry is not regulated, we simply don’t know what we’re buying, and that presents its own problem.

Though regulating the market could settle much of this, the federal government doesn’t want to do that. But it also doesn’t want to lose tax revenue, and that creates a conundrum. The government tends to take money from big pharma, not little mom-and-pop, so anything that can’t be transformed into pharmaceutical profits easily, isn’t desired by the government. It’s just like with Quaaludes, which were too easily made outside of pharma companies, making for a black market that the US couldn’t control.

What else has been done?

The FDA sending warning letters to delta-8 companies is the first big, above-board move by a government agency to try to stop this industry, but it wasn’t the first move made. A couple months ago, the biggest shopping sales platform, Shopify, started sending out its own similar letters, telling vendors they could not sell products with more than .3% delta-9 THC, and that they had to be in general compliance with federal law, which also rules out synthetics. Thus, tons of companies were affected.

Shopify didn’t stop with letters, and immediately forced companies to drop products from their online catalogues, that don’t meet regulation. This most certainly was a hit to the industry, though the lack of overall sales figures in general, makes it hard to know how much. Cannabinoid products are sold all over the place, and show up in a lot of small roadside stores. How much the industry relied on on-line sales, particularly from Shopify, is not clear.

Shopify didn’t make a statement about the US government making it do this. Nor did the US government make a statement about being involved in the Shopify issue. But most companies won’t shoot themselves in the foot if they don’t have to, and it’s hard to believe that Shopify would all of a sudden care about something it never cared about before. This was not an ongoing fight, but a directive that came out of nowhere. It suffices to say there was likely pressure from higher up, and that Shopify itself could have been shut down if it didn’t comply.

Are these products dangerous?

The US government hasn’t legalized cannabis yet, but we already know that that specific legalization is not what determines the safety of the plant. So regardless of whether something is federally illegal or not, whether it’s dangerous or not is an entirely different question. It’s almost joke level funny that Ms. Woodcock would speak about the dangers of compounds with no death toll, while close to 100,000 people die a year from government sanctioned opioids.

opioids

On top of that idea, the US government is getting close to passing a bill to legalize cannabis, whether it wants to call it a ‘legalization’, or a ‘decriminalization’. The MORE Act already passed the House and is now up for the Senate. And if that doesn’t make it, Senate Majority leader Chuck Schumer has his own baby, the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, which he’s carefully shopping around for support, and which hasn’t been officially offered, so as not to run out the clock prematurely.

Though a lot of reasons could be given for why the federal government is working hard now to pass something, one of the biggest reasons is that it must play catch-up with its states, so as not to seem powerless. Legalization measures are moving in only one direction, and its away from federal mandate. Soon enough, more and bigger publications, will point out how few people actually live under federal law concerning cannabis at this point. And as the government can no longer stop this train, it must now get on it, and pretend that was always the goal.

Conclusion

How much of an effect these FDA letters will have on the delta-8 industry is not known, and it might take some time to see results. The US government is obviously frustrated, but it’s also not in a position of power considering failed drug wars, and the lack of danger associated with this particular drug.

Maybe the delt-8 market isn’t the most savory. Maybe there are problems associated. But if the government really wanted to protect its people, it would do something substantial about the opioid epidemic, instead of railing against a plant (or its synthetic counterparts) which doesn’t realistically hurt anyone.

Hi to all! Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, the premiere website for independent coverage of the cannabis and psychedelics industries. Give the site a read-thru frequently to stay on-top of this quickly-changing landscape, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, to keep aware of everything going on.





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THCjd: What it Is and Where to Find It

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In today’s recreational cannabis market, we’re currently seeing this ongoing race to isolate and synthesize the most potent, safe, and quasi-legal compounds from the cannabis plant. Since the classic and most popular cannabinoid, Delta 9 THC, is still federally prohibited, we look to alternative THCs to get the job done. At this point, most people have heard of Delta 8 THC, or maybe even Delta 10 and THCV, but even more exist, and even more are on the horizon. The newest THC to make waves? THCjd. Scroll down to learn more about this compound, and for exclusive deals if you want to try it out yourself.

New cannabinoids and new products are exciting, and we love to cover them all! You can follow along by signing up for The THC Weekly Newsletterwhich will give you immediate access to offers on cannabis products, including vapes, edibles, and other products. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


Different types of THC 

By now we’re all relatively familiar with Delta-9 THC, how it functions in the body, and how it affects our minds. At a base level, most consumers know that THC is the predominant psychoactive compound in cannabis – it’s the reason pot gets us high. What is less commonly known, is how many THCs there really are; and why they’re different from each other; and which one is the most potent. 

As of late, the industry seems hellbent on accessing and synthesizing hundreds of new cannabinoids, both those that have been discovered in the cannabis plant, and various analogues and isomers. THC, and the possibility of different types of THC, has recently opened the discussion in some circles regarding the differing chain lengths of THCP, THCV, THC-H, THC-O, THCB, and so forth. This chain variation can be applied to other psychoactive cannabinoids like HHC.  

Now, keep in mind that these are all synthetic cannabinoids – but the definition of ‘synthetic cannabinoids’ can mean one of two things. First, synthetic cannabinoids are compounds that do not exist in nature and must be created in a lab, like THC-O. Also, a synthetic can be a cannabinoid that does exist in nature, but in such minimal amounts that in order to manufacture enough for it to be used in consumer products, it must still be synthesized in a lab, like Delta 8 THC. 

What is THCjd? 

When it comes to some of the newest compounds, like THCjd in particular, there is little to no information available. As a matter of fact, the only bit of info I was able to find, was from manufacturers. I couldn’t find any studies or even press releases about the scientific discovery of this compound.  

That being said, it’s not crazy to think that the companies who are making these products, doing the extractions, and working closely with these compounds don’t have the ability to use their extensive industry knowledge to formulate interesting new cannabinoids, like THCjd. According to some of the companies selling it, “THCjd is a rare, naturally occurring” cannabinoid. But again, I was unable to find any information about it in any type of scientific journal or official literature, in any capacity. Although it’s certainly possible that some of these companies are doing research behind the scenes that the general public doesn’t know about.  

The overall consensus is that THCjd is safe, creates an indica-like, couch lock type of high, and that it’s up to 19x more potent than delta 9 THC. As of now, it’s legal because no laws have been established yet to regulate it. 

Where to get THCjd

If you’re interested in being among the first group of consumers to try THCjd products, then you’re in luck because we have a few deals for you in our newsletter. Again, this is a very new compound so if you choose to buy it, make sure you go with a reputable brand. One of our favorites intro products to THCjd is the new THCjd/THC-H live resin gummies from Delta Extrax (see deal below). Check it out and make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter for more exciting deals.  

Try THCjd Live Resin Gummies for Only $19.49!

(Using ’35testers’ coupon code)

thcjd

An exciting new line of high potency gummies containing some new cannabinoids you’ve likely never heard of (scroll down to learn more about each one). These gummies each contain 125mg of active cannabinoids: Delta 9 THC, THCh, THCjd, THCP, and Live Resin Delta 8 THC. They come in 3 delicious flavors: Purple Berry, Root Beer Float, and Sour Peach.

TIP: Use the ’35testers’ coupon code to try these THCjd live resin gummies for only $19.49  each!

Click here to try the new THCjd live resin gummies!

(Using ’35testers’ coupon code)


If you’re interested in trying out THCjd products, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your top source for all things relating in the cannabis industry, including exclusive deals.  





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