Connect with us
[adrotate group="2"]

Business

Alcohol Yes, THC No? MJBizCon Highlights Inconsistent Cannabis Regulation

Published

on


Yup, you read that correctly, at this year’s largest cannabis event, MJBizCon, the alcohol was flowing for guests and operators, but no THC was allowed on the floor. Why would this be the case? And at a weed convention specifically? Alcohol, but no THC at MJBizCon highlights the inconsistent nature of cannabis regulation, and how THC is still being treated as more dangerous than alcohol.

Alright, we all know that there are some pretty inconsistent cannabis regulation measures in place, and hopefully that will change soon. Not only does it mean allowing alcohol where cannabis is not allowed, but it also means making for inconsistencies with cannabis compounds like delta-8 THC, THCV, CBDV, and more. We know that regulation can sometimes take time to get worked out right, so we’re happy to provide an array of deals for cannabis compounds like delta-8 THC while we wait for final answers. Cannabis provides lots of useful compounds so check out what we have on offer and figure out what works best for you. Make sure to subscribe to The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter for more articles like this one and exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, and other products. Save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!

What happened?

This year’s MJBizCon took place from October 20-22, 2021 at the Las Vegas Convention Center in Nevada. The convention area was filled with all kinds of cannabis operators from product vendors, to extraction equipment producers, to insurance providers, and so on. Samples were being given out all around, some even containing CBD, but what should have been the main star of the show, especially in a legalized state, wasn’t there.

According to its rules, MJBizCon, the biggest cannabis convention in the US, did not allow vendors to give samples containing THC. While this might have been okay, and actually a decent measure to keep people from getting as stoned while conducting business (alright, let’s be honest, everyone was just smoking up right outside the doors anyway), it did come with an interesting and opposing factor.

Alcohol was being openly sold on the convention floor, while no THC was allowed. Perhaps if it hadn’t been a cannabis convention, this inconsistent cannabis regulation might have been overlooked, but that’s exactly where we were. A convention set-up and designed for cannabis-related products and businesses, and those businesses were not even allowed to give samples of any products containing THC, while alcohol was being sold right next to them.

MJBizCon

Does it have to do with the fact that the THC would have been given out and not bought? Does it have to do with the fact that the alcohol wasn’t a sample, but paid for? Was there a thought that an under-ager might access THC if provisions weren’t in place for vendors to check IDs (even though it was an adults-only event)? What exactly was the reason that at MJBizCon, THC was treated like a scary uncle who shouldn’t be invited, and alcohol got a free pass in?

Why was there no THC?

To start with, why was there no THC? One would think that one of the main benefits to holding a convention such as this in a legalized state would be the ability for a full range of products to be on display, and given as samples. After all, when going to a wine tasting, it’s not standard policy to not serve alcohol (and certainly not to deny this while allowing people to toke on joints next to booths with fake wine). If this were happening in Indiana, no THC would make sense, but this is Vegas, the city where anything goes, and a city in Nevada, which legalized the recreational use of cannabis in 2016, starting a market in 2017.

According to MJBizCon itself, the decision to not allow THC had to do with an agreement made between MJBizCon and the Convention Center where the event was hosted. The official language used states that “in accordance with the professional nature of the event, the use, distribution or sale of any products containing THC is strictly prohibited at the event, in the exhibit hall, conference sessions, or any other function space where the event is conducted. Any individual who possesses, transports or consumes any THC-based products is solely responsible for his/her compliance with local and state regulations.”

There’s something I find interesting about this statement. It cites the professional nature of the event as a reason not to have THC. This is funny because it’s a professional event concerning cannabis, which makes THC an actually necessary component. It also makes the designation, therefore, that while THC would be unprofessional, alcohol, is not. The more important factor, however, is that it mentioned compliance with state and local laws.

So, if someone was caught illegally dispensing THC at the convention, does that mean that they’d have to answer to Nevada state law about the use of cannabis? And does Nevada state law actually state that cannabis is more dangerous than alcohol?

Nevada cannabis law

As stated, Nevada passed its recreational cannabis bill on November 17th, 2017, which came through ballot measure Question 2 on the 2016 ballot. This opened an adult-use market for those 21 and above, and put in place a set of regulations for how cannabis can be used. These regulations include many things, from how a dispensary can sell its products, to taxation, to how cannabis can be used by the masses. And its here that a couple provisions come up, that back-up why MJBizCon really couldn’t legally allow THC.

cannabis Nevada

For one, according to Nevada cannabis law, it’s illegal to consume cannabis outside a private residence. Since the Convention Center is not a private residence, it technically does not fit the requirement of where a person can legally use cannabis. Though this last stipulation is true of Nevada in general, Las Vegas did, in fact, legalize the use of cannabis for public consumption in ‘social use’ venues, as a part of Assembly Bill No. 341. I can’t say whether the law technically has gone into effect yet, but it’s certainly due to.

However, even this wouldn’t make it automatically okay to smoke up in the Convention Center. In order for a location to be legal for public consumption, the establishment must apply for and receive an on-site consumption license. Even if the new law is in effect, it could not be expected that this was already done. Without such a license, smoking cannabis publicly in Nevada can incur a misdemeanor penalty of $600. In this way, the Convention Center indeed had no legal right to allow THC consumption on the property during the convention.

Yes alcohol, no THC, isn’t this inconsistent for cannabis regulation?

So, now the question becomes, how is it that Nevada legally defines it as okay to drink alcohol in public, but not okay to ingest cannabis in the same public places? Nevada has no issue allowing alcohol anywhere, and it can be found in any place a bar can be set up, or any place a shelf can be put in place to hold bottles. This inconsistent cannabis regulation standard implies that alcohol is somehow okay – or less dangerous, and that THC is not okay, and more dangerous.

To be clear. No matter how many government smear campaigns there are, this will never be the case. While cannabis has no actual death toll related to it (save for cases where other ingredients were added for whatever purpose which made users sick), alcohol has one of the biggest death tolls worldwide.

Not only have studies come out showing absolutely no safe level of alcohol (and this in contrast to cannabis which has a wide-ranging medical market), but alcohol was found to be the 7th leading risk factor world-wide in 2016 for the disability-adjusted life year (DALY), a metric which measures the overall burden of disease in reference to numbers of years lost because of sickness, disability, and death.

Further to this, in the age group 15-49, alcohol was the primary risk factor for 2016 for death and disability. And further to this, according to the NIH, about 95,000 deaths a year are attributable to alcohol-related causes in the US. In the year 2014 alone, drunk-driving related deaths reached 9,967 in the US, which accounted for an entire 31% of all deaths related to driving for the year. 3.3 million deaths were attributed to alcohol globally in 2012. As of 2019, it was established that approximately 14.1 million adults in the US have a drinking problem, and nearly half a million children aged 12-17 do as well.

cannabis vs alcohol

In terms of damage, since the most that can be said for cannabis is that it might impair driving, and since no death count is related to it, and since it is widely used as a medicine whereas alcohol has never been found to have medical value, the comparison between them is almost ridiculous. And this begs the question, why is cannabis being more harshly regulated than alcohol?

Conclusion

Unfortunately, I can’t offer any answer to these questions. MJBizCon was legally correct in not allowing THC during the event, but the regulation measure they were forced to abide by highlights the inconsistent nature of cannabis regulation, especially when compared to alcohol. Hopefully, this crazy discrepancy will be noticed by more people, and hopefully with time, more logical regulations can be set. For now, we’re in a world where you can go to a convention specifically for cannabis, and yet not be able to access it, while a much more damaging substance is on-sale in the very same place.

At the moment, we’ll just have to deal with these legal and logical inconsistencies, and be glad that at least the laws of prohibition are changing, even if it takes time to really get it right.

Hi and welcome…! You made it to CBDtesters.co, your best online spot for the most thought-provoking and relevant cannabis and psychedelics-related news from everywhere in the world. Give us a read-thru frequently to stay aware of the quickly-moving world of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and remember to sign up for The Delta 8 Weekly Newsletter, so you never miss a single thing.

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.





Source link

Business

Exploring Cannabis Culture in Moscow, Russia

Published

on


Zdravstvuyte and welcome to Moscow, the mysterious, majestic and imposing capital of Russia. Where Vodka is swigged to the cheers of nostravya and hot baths or banya’s are enjoyed by all. A Beautiful city with a wealth of history, but what is the Russian capital’s attitude to cannabis?

Would you be safe smoking a spliff in front of St Peter’s Basilica? In this edition of cannabis culture, we’re jetting off to Moskva to find out. Here at CBD testers, when we talk about cannabis culture we are discussing ‘the way that cannabis can be perceived and treated within a society, city or country.’ This means all aspects of cannabis not just smoking, but also the attitudes and use of cannabinoid oil products and the attitudes towards medical cannabis too. So, wrap up warm, drink down your borscht and welcome to Moscow.

Whether you’re talking about the US, Europe, or anywhere else in the world, cannabis culture can vary significantly. To learn about laws across the globe, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your hub for all things cannabis-related. Also save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


Moscow

Moscow is the capital of Russia, located in the far western side of the giant country. First mentioned in 1147, it has grown from a small city located on the river Moskva into the largest city in Europe, by population. Moscow was the capital of the USSR until it fell apart, when it then was declared the capital of the Russian Federation. Throughout history, Moscow has seen battles and sieges, from Napoleon to the Nazis, both falling at the walls of the Kremlin. It is a mega-city, the financial capital of Russia as well as its cultural capital with many theatres, writers and poets hailing from the city. The Bolshoy is one of the largest and most famous ballet theatres in the world and the Moscow Arts theatre was the original home of Checkov’s The Seagull and Uncle Vanya. Let’s take a closer look at some of the must see places to visit in the Russian capital.

Red Square

Located in the centre of Moscow, Red Square is one of the most famous tourist sites in the whole of europe. An imposing public square just outside the dark red walls of the Kremlin, the red square would make any one feel tiny. The name actually comes from the Russian word Krasny, which used to mean beautiful, but later meant red in more modern Russian. The square is home to a whole host of famous sights, including: St Peter’s basilica the candy coloured church with beautiful spires, Lenin’s tomb, where you are still able to visit the preserved body of the founding father of the USSR, and the Russian State historical museum, a fantastic collection of artefacts about the Russian state. 

Pushkin Museum 

The beautiful Pushkin museum is a must see in the city of Moscow. Home to over 700 000 individual pieces of art, there’s almost too much to see in one day. Hundreds of sculptures, beautiful paintings and from across the whole world, it’s one of the best art museums I’ve ever visited.

The Moscow Metro

I know, you’re probably wondering why I’d put a mode of public transport on the top things to see in Moscow, but the metro is in itself a work of art. Each station was individually built to be as grand as possible. Some have works of art, some are painted like the inside of a great ballroom… One thing’s for sure, each one is spectacularly individual.

Cannabis in Moscow

So what is the relationship between the muscovites and cannabis? Well it’s a little tricky, recently the government has been cracking down on drug control and convictions in the city. The laws have become tough, as described below, and it is very tricky to find cannabis in Russia and even dangerous to do so. This tricky relationship with cannabis started with the USSR, who cracked down on cannabis and opium in the 60’s and 70’s to defeat what they called narcomania. These strict laws have lasted into modern Russia and Putin has vocally demonstrated his dislike of drugs and drug culture.

Is It Legal?

To be blunt, no. Russia has very strict drug laws and these extend to cannabis. Russia has one of the highest numbers of people per capita imprisoned for drug possession in europe and this is likely due to the rather draconian laws surrounding drugs, including cannabis.  Cannabis is included on list 1 of narcotic and psychoactive substances, which means it is treated with the strictest level of control. Possession of cannabis in Russia and Moscow would lead to a fine of a few thousand dollars and this is only if you’re caught with an amount of less than 6 grams. A law passed in 2006 meant that any amount below 6 grams was classed as an administrative issue, so dealt with fines, anything above was considered a large amount and could lead to a prison sentence or a large fine of up to 40,000 rubles.

However, if the person caught, willingly hands in the cannabis and then gives up any information that may lead to more drug related arrests, then they may avoid penalties. It is particularly risky for a foreigner to be in possession of cannabis in Russia. Polica may be more likely to ask for a bribe, which may be even higher than the fine. If you don’t pay this, they can threaten to take your passport or fine you. In fact, recently an American student was fined $230 for the possession of cannabis in St Petersburg. What’s more interesting is that the cannabis was medicinal. Medical cannabis as well as cannabinoid oils are illegal in Russia, although there is research going into the benefits of cannabis medically. Also, interestingly medical cannabis was briefly permitted for anyone arriving into Moscow for the 2018 world cup!

Picking up in Moscow

Despite the tough laws, people do still smoke cannabis in Moscow. In fact a recent survey suggested that there were around 8 million drug users in Russia. Picking up drugs in Moscow is not strictly advised, considering the illegality. However, if one was desperately in need of some cannabis, then there are methods. Many reddit groups discuss the best ways to pick up cannabis in Moscow and many advise visiting nightclubs and speaking to younger citizens. Drugs do exist in the city, however they have to be found. Locals will be better to ask than any drug sellers on the street. It is strongly advised not to accept any drugs from someone selling on the streets, firstly because it is impossible to know whether these sellers are police or not and secondly because the quality is likely to be horrendous.

Even when you do find a local to advise you on where to pick up cannabis, the results can be somewhat complicated. I stayed in Moscow for two months and a friend of mine was sent on a rather comical journey to pick up cannabis. A local had advised him to message on a particular facebook site, protected from police view. Someone from this site then messaged him a location (after he’d bank transferred some money). The location was an hour outside of Moscow, in a forest… He had to cycle out into the forest and follow the exact directions to a marker on his map. When there, he found a small baggy, hidden underneath some foliage. We tried it… it was terrible, but the journey, he says, was worth it for the story. 

The Future of Drugs in Moscow

A reform in Russian drug policy doesn’t seem to be on the horizon. In a bleak survey, done in 2014, only 14% of Russians believed that drugs such as Cannabis should be legalised. With a proportion that low, it seems unlikely that the government will make any large scale changes. A quite famous case of an anti corruption journalist called Andrey Golunov, who was arrested for supposed trafficking of cannabis, has stirred some debate about the laws surrounding drugs in Russia.

The journalist claimed that the cannabis found on him had been planted and, indeed, the court agreed. The law, article 228, that allows for arrests to be made for people carrying over 6 grams, has been called under question and there are reports that the government is willing to discuss shortening the quite brutal sentences for non-trafficking related drug possession. Perhaps this, as well as a growing scepticism within youth groups in Russia, could be the start of a slow progression towards legalisation.  

Conclusion

So, perhaps Moscow isn’t exactly the most cannabis friendly city in the world… in fact it may be one of the strictest in Europe, but there is still evidence of some cannabis culture. Within younger generations, in the reddit groups, in the surreptitious packages in forests, cannabis culture is still extant in the beautiful city of Moscow. However, we really don’t recommend actively seeking out cannabis in the Russian capital, at least not just yet, as the law is still very strict and unless you want to pay a hefty fine at least, it may be safer to enjoy the city without our wonderful plant… at least until the Russian’s come to their senses about cannabis. 

Welcome to CBDtesters.co! The internet’s one-stop-shop for the most thought-provoking and important cannabis and psychedelics-related news going on globally. Join us everyday to stay informed on this ever-changing landscape of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletterso you’re always first on getting the important news.

Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advise, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.





Source link

Continue Reading

Business

Legacy Cannabis Operators Shunned From Billion Dollar Industry

Published

on


Legacy cannabis operators are the ones who bore the brunt of prohibition and paved the way for a new, legal market to flourish; one worth billions and one that has been unwelcoming, at best, to these industry OGs. Cannabis activists and many longtime business owners are pushing for the inclusion of legacy brands in the world of legalized pot. Otherwise, states are missing out on billions of dollars annually as illicit sales continue to thrive, even in recreational markets.  

The cannabis industry has changed a lot over the last few years, but fundamentally, we all want the same thing: progress, although that could have varying meanings for different people. For more articles like this one, and for exclusive deals on flowers, vapes, edibles, and other products, remember to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter. Also save big on Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP & HHC products by checking out our “Best-of” lists!


What are legacy cannabis operators?  

Legacy operators are the trailblazers who started their cannabis businesses before it was legal, and are much more in-line with ‘stoner culture’ and history. The term can refer to business owners who run “grey market” dispensaries that have not yet become legally compliant, or street dealers who continue operating the same way they have been for decades. 

While some legacy operators have no intentions of going legit, an overwhelming majority say they would if the process wasn’t so expensive and permeated with red tape. With so many different and constantly changing regulations to adhere to, and startup costs in the hundreds of thousands, it’s no surprise that legality is out of reach for many.  

Take De’Shawn Avery from New York, who has been selling flowers for years and claims he “provided a very in-demand product when there was no product.” Before legalization, savvy entrepreneurs like Avery were a community staple that many of us were very grateful for; after legalization, they began to worry about the future of their businesses and what their roles would be in the new industry.  

Avery, and generations of other legacy dealers, fear they don’t fit the modern-day archetype of a cannabis businessperson. “It’s usually not Black people or people with records who are favored when it comes to money-making opportunities,” he pointed out.

And he’s not far off the mark for thinking that way. A few states have started to keep information on demographics within the cannabis industry and a study conducted by Marijuana Business Daily found that only 4.3 percent of cannabis companies are owned by African Americans, 5.7 percent were Hispanic/Latino owned, and 2.4% were owned by Asian Americans. That leaves 87.6 percent of pot business that are white-owned, most of which are also male-owned companies.  

To make matters worse, in most states people with prior felonies face additional restrictions when applying for cannabis business licensing. So, let’s say a legacy operator gets arrested on felony drug possession charges, then cannabis becomes legal in their state the following year. Despite having experience in the industry, existing clientele, and the perfect opportunity to transition from working in the shadows to being a legitimate business owner; they would have to wait 3 to 10 years before they could legally apply for a license. At that point, all the other businesses in their area would be already established, have possibly stolen some of their customers, and it would be even more difficult to get a foot in the door. 

The cannabis industry is definitely more inclusive than others, but often, still holds on tightly to that ‘old-boys club’ mentality that can make women, minorities, and those longtime legacy operators feel shut out.  

Looking West 

For a perfect example of the struggles faced by cannabis legacy operators, let’s take a quick look at what has been going on in California since the state passed proposition 215 and legalized medical marijuana back in 1996. At that point, the industry was still small and totally fringe. Most residents did not even know that cannabis had been legalized medicinally for so many years, and there were only a small number of dispensaries scattered throughout the state. 

By the time I turned 18 (in 2008) and was able to get a ‘medical card’ (which was shockingly easy and practically every pothead I knew had one), the industry had become very recreational. “Dispensaries”, or retail pot shops, were popping up everywhere. I once bought weed from a guy who was running his “dispensary” out of a detached garage on is property in the middle of Victorville, a small town in the high desert on the way to Vegas.

That “anything-goes” state of the industry led to the eventual passing of Proposition 64 in 2016, which legalized the possession and recreational use of cannabis for anyone 21 years of age or older. A lot of the businesses operating under the original medical regime, or under the table as many were, could not meet all the demands of operating in the new legal market, and thus, were forced to shut down or continue running illegally.  

One of the biggest issues, aside from the exorbitant costs of licensing, were local moratoriums and that zoned only certain areas for cultivation, retail, and other cannabis operations. By July 2021, still just 31 counties and 181 cities (out of 58 and 482, respectively) allow any type of marijuana businesses within their jurisdictions.  

 “We voted for a law, and we are blocked at the local level,” says Andrew DeAngelo, a long-time California cannabis activist, industry consultant, and co-founder of legacy dispensary chain, Harborside Collective. “There are big counties that are known for growing weed where it’s banned,” he adds. 

States are losing billions 

This excessive regulation, greed, lack of consultation or legal help, and over-taxation has resulted in an estimated loss of up to 75% of potential cannabis revenues in some markets. In California, for example, data firms peg the number at around $5.6 billion dollars lost to the illicit market every year, that’s just over one half of the market’s total value in the state.  

It’s the only state so far that has seen recreational sales shrink following legalization. And the massive busts of illegal businesses rage on as high taxes and insane operating costs drive up prices, which are then passed on to the consumer. Instead of paying more money for crappier product, many people just stick to buying it from their dealers or illegal dispensaries that charge less and don’t pay taxes.  

Not to mention the convenience of buying from dealers, who have traditionally operated on a text-and-delivery or text-and-pickup basis. Even with a growing number of drive-throughs and delivery services, it’s still so much easier to buy from your local plug sometimes.  

A ‘less-than-welcoming’ industry  

The B2B side of the cannabis world is just like any other industry, and to be successful, you’ll need to be familiar with all the legislative and business jargon that comes with a billion-dollar industry. In cannabis, things can be much more complicated as far as regulations and business dealings are concerned; so the list of topics you’ll need to know, at least at a base level, can get quite expansive.  

“I’ve had to educate myself tremendously just to make sure I can speak the language that these people are speaking,” says Marie Montmarquet, co-founder of MD Numbers, a family of weed brands from cultivation to retail that previously operated a delivery business prior to legalization. “So, if I’m in a meeting and they’re talking about 1031 Real Estate transfers, I know what 1031 Real Estate transfers are.” 

The ultra-capitalistic environment coupled with constant oversight and regular contact with law enforcement and state/local governments, fosters an environment that feels stuffy, tense, and inhospitable – especially for anyone who has faced their own legal turmoil over cannabis, and still cannot fully trust those powers that be.  

Nomenclature: Legacy market vs black market  

Much like the politicized issue of the words “marijuana” vs “cannabis”, there is an ongoing debate about replacing the term “black market” with different phrases, one of which is “legacy market”. Black market doesn’t apply solely to cannabis, it refers to any economic activity that happens illegally.  

The selling of illegal products, of course, is a black market activity. But selling legal products in ways that are not prohibited also classifies. Like buying cigarettes in one state and selling them in another, for example. Cigarettes are legal in every US state, but because tobacco tax codes vary so much, you cannot legally buy cigarettes in Arizona and go sell them in California for a profit.  

The idea has been floating around that using the phrase “black market” is outdated and culturally insensitive. Danielle Jackson (Miz D), a Vancouver-born artist, advocate and entrepreneur, was one of the first to say publicly that “legacy market” should be used over “black market” when describing pre-legalization cannabis businesses. Her comment got overwhelming support from the audience.  

Many are tweeting in agreeance, such as Jennifer Caldwell , partner and technical lead at Cannabis License Experts, who added that, “To me, the term ‘black market’ implies a negative connotation of illegality and illegitimacy. Whether people are growing illegally or not is a complex topic at the moment.” 

Moving forward

Seeing how much money is on the line, legal states are beginning to offer incentives to make the transition more seamless for legacy cannabis operators. In California, in addition to the $100 million bailout, Governor Newsom has suggested expungement of cannabis-related convictions as well as an extension to allow licensees that have missed the deadlines to transition; albeit at high costs and great inconvenience, still. Other states are taking similar steps to ensure these business owners – the true backbone of the industry – are less excluded.

With legacy dealers, the experience can be a very mom-and-pop, tight-knit atmosphere, so word of out is key to the growth of these businesses. When big businesses come and take over all the available retail locations, cultivation spaces, and advertising channels, there’s little room left for any small businesses to make a name for themselves.  

“We’ve seen in lots of other states that big pharma, big tobacco, alcohol and large companies are all prepared to move in and just take over right away,” says New York State Senator Liz Krueger. “We don’t want that to be the story in New York. We want the story to be small mom-and-pop community-based businesses starting and growing and expanding…[and] we want people who are selling in the communities that they live in, in the illegal market and out of the illegal market.” 

“We don’t need anybody that’s coming in here just for the financial aspect,” added Edgar Cruz, CEO of cannabis brand Ekstrepe, based out of Long Beach, California. “We all understand that this is a cash cow now. What we need is support for our communities to make sure that we are included in this kind of cultural-based industry.” 

Final thoughts  

This is a lesson that every state or country considering legalization needs to take note of. Despite the financial success of the legal cannabis industry, we need more education and resources, and less taxes and regulatory red tape to harness the untapped knowledge, connections, experience, and economic wealth that exists in the legacy market. Otherwise, consumers will continue shopping in illicit markets, states will lose millions, and legalization will have done little more than prevent people from getting arrested for pot possession in certain areas.

Hello all! Welcome to CBDtesters.co, your ultimate online destination for the most relevant and thought-provoking cannabis and psychedelics-related news globally. Check back regularly to stay on top of the constantly-moving world of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletterso you never miss a thing.

Disclaimer: Hi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.





Source link

Continue Reading

Beauty

Look Your Best: The Benefits of Hemp Cosmetics

Published

on


There are a lot of ways to use the cannabis plant, and a lot of products that can be made. Whether a person wants to smoke flower, vape a concentrate, eat an edible, inhale via a nasal spray, get it through a patch, or rub it all over their skin, each of these methods allows a person to ingest compounds, or use the plant in some way. In the case of cosmetics, the goal isn’t to get high, the goal is to look good. So here are some basics of the benefits of hemp cosmetics.

The benefits of hemp cosmetics are substantial compared to standard petroleum-based cosmetics, and this is good for personal health, and the environment. Cannabis is great in that way, offering tons of positive medical and recreational attributes from smoking up, to getting ready for a night out. Plus, with the new and wide-ranging cannabinoids market, not only can products be bought outside of regulation, but there are tons of new offerings including delta-8 THC, THCV, and HHC among others. Check out all our current deals and find the products perfect for you.


What are hemp cosmetics?

As always, before getting into the benefits of hemp cosmetics, its best to first describe what we’re talking about. Most people probably have a working definition of cosmetics in their head. Nonetheless, for anyone that needs a formal definition, cosmetics are “relating to, or making for beauty especially of the complexion.” With a second definition defining that this is “done or made for the sake of appearance.”

In other words, makeup, and skin care items. Whether you’re moisturizing your skin to get that awesome healthy glow, rubbing rouge on your cheeks, covering up those blemishes, or putting thickening cream in your hair, these are all examples of products used to improve appearance, and they all fit under the title of ‘cosmetics’.

Cosmetics are far and away mainly female bought items. In very few societies today is it standard for men to wear makeup, though this certainly doesn’t preclude them from doing so. Especially when it comes to things like covering blemishes, or hair care (including shaving), men do take part in the market as well.

hemp cosmetics

Hemp cosmetics are cosmetics that incorporate hemp into their ingredients list, many using hemp oil as the base for the product. With tons of medical properties, there are many benefits to the user for using of hemp cosmetics. This isn’t simply because hemp can offer so much, but also as an alternative to the often-not-safe chemicals used in standard cosmetics today.

Today’s cosmetic industry

The actual history of cosmetics in the US is generally not written about well. In fact, over the years I’ve watched basic historical information disappear from the internet, seemingly as a form of censorship. Which actually makes sense in this situation, as the real story of cosmetics and big oil is a rather seedy one. It’s also likely the reason there is virtually no regulation in cosmetics (apart from chemicals used for coloring), since regulation would end the ability to use petroleum byproducts in products.

In short, “In the 1950s, government subsidies incentivized companies to process oil byproducts into synthetic chemicals and resins. Capitalizing on these generous subsidies, the cosmetic industry hired chemical engineers to design their products, with the resulting synthetic substances sold as body and skin ‘care’ products.  The cosmetic industry created the misconception that the skin is impervious, and regulations misleadingly classify oil cosmetics as ‘external’ products –  ignoring the effects of dermal chemical absorption.”

Not only was a weird idea developed that the skin actually acts as a barrier to the chemicals put on it (we know now that is highly and dangerously untrue), but without instituting regulation, it allowed for these chemicals to be used for decades of time despite continuous information to the contrary being put out about their safety.

I expect this is precisely why no regulation measure exists. The government supports big oil, and supported oil byproducts being used in cosmetics. If you’re going to promote an industry to use bad chemicals, and you want to get away with it, you have to forego all regulation to ensure those bad chemicals aren’t ruled out.

More recently, adding onto the petroleum problem, a new oil is now being used for cosmetics, complete with its own issues. Palm oil. Though palm oil provides a safer ingredient than petroleum byproducts, it comes with a massive environmental toll in the form of deforestation (reportedly, 8% of the world’s forests were destroyed for palm oil production between 1990 and 2008.) This is also related to peatlands becoming flammable when drained to grow palm, resulting in fires that cause more carbon emissions, and effect the health of those who breathe in the smoke.

palm oil

According to Greenpeace, “more than 900,000 people in Indonesia have suffered acute respiratory infections due to the smoke from fires in 2019, and nearly 10 million children are at risk of lifelong physical and cognitive damages due to air pollution.” In fact, “In the first 10 months of 2019, these fires released an amount of CO2 close to the UK’s total annual greenhouse gas emissions.” Palm is used because it’s a cheap oil, for which production has massively increased in the last several decades.

What are the benefits of hemp cosmetics vs standard?

Now that we’ve gone through how the standard (generally corporate) cosmetics industry is a rather dirty place, this leads us to the benefits that can be gained by using hemp-based cosmetics instead. We already know that hemp offers massive health and environmental benefits (or less detractions) than standard materials in many industries, and for many products. Whether it’s building materials like cement, or leather, paint and finishing products, plastics, or even batteries, hemp offers a safer alternative. And this can be seen for cosmetics as well.

When used in cosmetics, what we’re talking about isn’t hemp flowers, but hemp seed oil. Hemp seed oil is “extracted by cold-pressing hemp seeds. Hemp oil is rich in properties that makes it a very effective moisturizer functioning as an emollient to soften and smoothen the skin. Hemp seed oil is high in essential fatty acids (omegas 3 and 6), polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) and other nutrients that keep the skin in a good condition.”

As hemp is natural, recyclable, non-toxic, and biodegradable, it makes the far better option for what to put on your skin, than something toxic that will go directly to your bloodstream. Think about all those oil derivatives, and what that means to your body to be ingesting them.

If you’re wondering if chemical absorption into the bloodstream through the skin is really an issue, (as it is often touted as a non-issue), it’s best to remember that things like birth control patches, nicotine patches, and fentanyl patches are all used for a reason. And understanding that on the one hand, should allow the logic in, that the skin absorbs what’s put on it. This might not go for everything (often an argument to back up using such chemicals), but it’ll go for most things.

According to a Huffington Post article which references Environmental Working Group research, “In 2005, the Environmental Working Group published a combination of two studies that found toxic chemicals in the umbilical cord blood of newborn babies born in the U.S. in the fall of 2004. They screened for more than 400 chemicals, and an astounding 287 toxins were detected within the umbilical cord blood of these newborns.”

cosmetic absorption

What were they? “Of these 287 chemicals, 217 were neurotoxins, and 208 are known to damage growth development or cause birth defects. These toxins included mercury, polyaromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), polybrominated and polychlorinated dibenzodioxins and furans (PBCD/F and PBDD/F), perflorinated chemicals (PFCs), organochlorine pesticides like DDT and chlordane, polybrominated diphenyl ethers (PBDEs), polychlorinated napthalenes (PCNs), polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and many others. These study results have been largely ignored by the media.” While not all of this relates to cosmetics, many of these chemicals can indeed be found in skincare products.

More specific benefits of hemp cosmetics

We’ve gone over that hemp is safer than petroleum-based cosmetics, but what can it actually do for a person? Here are some basics of the benefits of using hemp cosmetics. When referring to ‘hemp oil’ it means oil derived from the hemp plant, and this implies the presence of CBD. Sometimes CBD oils – which are hemp oils – are sold in concentrated form, but there should always be CBD in hemp oil, unless its specifically taken out to meet a regulation. Even in these cases, there is likely to be a trace amount.

According to Dr. Tina Alster, clinical professor of dermatology at Washington DC’s Georgetown University Medical Center, “CBD may have a positive impact on a variety of health concerns and conditions including chronic pain, joint Inflammation, anxiety, insomnia, headaches, memory, nausea, neurological disorders, skin disorders and more.”

In terms of specifically offering benefits to the skin, Dr. Alster related that “CBD oil has an anti-inflammatory property, which can benefit the skin, and it can also reduce oil production, provide moisture and relieve pain and itching.”

The doctor states, “Topical CBD is safe and works effectively for all skin types. The products are easy to administer. Sufferers of serious medical skin conditions and those who are seeking innovative skincare options can benefit from topical CBD use… Anti-inflammatory properties associated with CBD are beneficial in treating such dermatologic conditions as acne, psoriasis and eczema due to reduction of dryness, irritation and redness. CBD-containing creams, oils, gels and serums not only moisturize and soothe the skin but are also showing encouraging results in relieving pain caused by certain skin disorders.”

Conclusion

Hemp oil offers two basic things for the cosmetics industry. First, it offers a non-toxic base oil to work with which isn’t associated with massive environmental or medical damage. It’s not a byproduct of the oil industry, or a reason for mass deforestation. It’s plant material, and that beats out any synthetic or petroleum-based material out there.

benefits hemp cosmetics

Second, it’s actually good for the skin. It promotes skin health, by offering it the vitamins and minerals that it needs to be functioning at its best. While much in the cosmetics world is meant to cover up imperfections, hemp oil cosmetic products can do the same and more, offering a way to look better, which actually helps eliminate issues by promoting healthier skin function.

Hello and welcome all! Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, your preeminent location for the most important and thought-provoking cannabis and psychedelics-related news globally. Give the site a read-thru regularly to stay up-to-date on the ever-moving landscape of legal drugs and industrial hemp, and make sure to sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, so nothing important ever gets by you.

DisclaimerHi, I’m a researcher and writer. I’m not a doctor, lawyer, or businessperson. All information in my articles is sourced and referenced, and all opinions stated are mine. I am not giving anyone advice, and though I am more than happy to discuss topics, should someone have a further question or concern, they should seek guidance from a relevant professional.





Source link

Continue Reading
CBD50 mins ago

FOX NEWS THE FIVE LIVE 1/10/22 #foxnews #thefive #live #cannabis #smokesesh #miami #florida #gutfeld

CBD2 hours ago

WAKE AND BAKE CANNABIS ANALYSIS SHOW 1/5/22 #live #smokesesh #news #music #florida #letsgobrandon

CBD3 hours ago

High hopes, slim chances: recreational marijuana's future in Florida

CBD4 hours ago

BREAKING: Cannabis(HEMP) can protect against SARS -COVID-2 infections ,New Study shows

CBD5 hours ago

FOX NEWS THE FIVE LIVE 1/12/22 #cannabis #smokesesh #foxnews #jenpsaki #whitehouse #press #briefing

CBD6 hours ago

Firecracker Jinx Figure Unboxing – LoL Figurines

CBD7 hours ago

VIDEO: Deadly Rock Slide Kills Boaters At Brazilian Lake | 8 Dead & 20 Missing In Brazil Jan 8 2022

Cannabinoids8 hours ago

DIY: How to Make Your Own CBN

CBD8 hours ago

The Gringo Farmer

CBD9 hours ago

Boom time for marijuana sales in Illinois, as industry expands with new products

CBD10 hours ago

Will Smoking Cannabis Increase Your Risk of Catching the Coronavirus and Other Cannabis News

CBD11 hours ago

FOX NEWS THE FIVE LIVE 1/11/22 #cannabis #smokesesh #miami #florida #weed #gutfeld #watters #foxnews

CBD12 hours ago

Lake Got Weeds? Razor Cutter for Removing Lake and Pond Weed for hydrilla milfoil cattails lily pads

CBD13 hours ago

Biafra News-BINTA NYAKO ẆḀṚṄṠ BUHARI, MALAMI ṠṪRAṪĖGIĖS & PLANS ḞḀİḶĖḌ! ḞRĖĖ MNK NOW OR I ẆIṪHḌṚḀẆ!

CBD14 hours ago

Launching CBD gummies to consumers

Uncategorized14 hours ago

Cannabis Compounds Prevented Covid Infection in Recent Laboratory Study

CBD15 hours ago

Canadian Marijuana.. Sell the News? 6/6/2018 by ChartGuys.com

CBD16 hours ago

Cannabis fights Cornholio…. #cannabis #comedy #funny #coronavirus #Fauci #news

CBD17 hours ago

MASSIVE SNDL NEWS 🔥 SNDL SHORT SQUEEZE COMING? 🚀🚀 $SNDL SHORTS ARE SCARED

CBD18 hours ago

Dutchj – Minecraft: All You Will Ever Need To Know About Wheat Farming

benefits of thcv6 months ago

BREAKING: MASSIVE FOOD SHORTAGE ACROSS THE USA – GOVERNMENT WARNING ON CROP LOSS AND WATER SHORTAGE

CBD4 months ago

North Carolina Medical Marijuana Legalization Bill Approved by Senators in Committee

Cannabinoids5 months ago

Legal Loophole? Everyone is Buying Legal Delta 9 THC Gummies Online…

smoking5 months ago

THESE CARDANO PROJECTS WILL 100X IN 2021 🚀 (Get In ASAP)

Deals4 months ago

Have You Tried The New High-Potency THCP Vape Cartridges?

smoking6 months ago

A look inside Jim Belushi's 93-acre cannabis farm in Southern Oregon

CBD6 months ago

Federal Cannabis Legalization Will Happen Before 2022, According to Rohrabacher

Cannabinoids5 months ago

What Is HHC (Hexahydrocannabinol) and Is It Safe To Use?

Education6 months ago

6 milestones in the CBD industry

Deals6 months ago

Best Delta 10 Carts: Top Delta 10 THC Vape Cartridges

food6 months ago

How to Make Weed Butter for Baking Edibles

CBD6 months ago

10 Things You Didn’t Know About CBD for Dogs • Stoner Blog

smoking6 months ago

TOP 5 Crypto Coins for 2022 (EARLIEST Altcoin Predictions!)

CBD3 months ago

Federal Marijuana Legalization Vote In Congress | MORE Act 2021

food6 months ago

Cannabis Infused MCT Oil Tincture FOR HIGH THC EDIBLES

benefits of thcv6 months ago

STARVATION AND SHORTAGE – FOOD COST WILL HIT A 30 YEAR HIGH – INFLATION AFFECTING THE USA

CBD6 months ago

Long COVID Treatment, Symptoms, and Recovery (Long Haulers)

smoking5 months ago

Why Is The Crypto Market Crashing Today?

CBD Flowers5 months ago

Introducing THCO Flower & THC-O Pre-Rolls

food6 months ago

How To Make Weed Gummies (Edibles)

Trending