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Cannabinoids

THCjd: What it Is and Where to Find It

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In today’s recreational cannabis market, we’re currently seeing this ongoing race to isolate and synthesize the most potent, safe, and quasi-legal compounds from the cannabis plant. Since the classic and most popular cannabinoid, Delta 9 THC, is still federally prohibited, we look to alternative THCs to get the job done. At this point, most people have heard of Delta 8 THC, or maybe even Delta 10 and THCV, but even more exist, and even more are on the horizon. The newest THC to make waves? THCjd. Scroll down to learn more about this compound, and for exclusive deals if you want to try it out yourself.

New cannabinoids and new products are exciting, and we love to cover them all! You can follow along by signing up for The THC Weekly Newsletterwhich will give you immediate access to offers on cannabis products, including vapes, edibles, and other products. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


Different types of THC 

By now we’re all relatively familiar with Delta-9 THC, how it functions in the body, and how it affects our minds. At a base level, most consumers know that THC is the predominant psychoactive compound in cannabis – it’s the reason pot gets us high. What is less commonly known, is how many THCs there really are; and why they’re different from each other; and which one is the most potent. 

As of late, the industry seems hellbent on accessing and synthesizing hundreds of new cannabinoids, both those that have been discovered in the cannabis plant, and various analogues and isomers. THC, and the possibility of different types of THC, has recently opened the discussion in some circles regarding the differing chain lengths of THCP, THCV, THC-H, THC-O, THCB, and so forth. This chain variation can be applied to other psychoactive cannabinoids like HHC.  

Now, keep in mind that these are all synthetic cannabinoids – but the definition of ‘synthetic cannabinoids’ can mean one of two things. First, synthetic cannabinoids are compounds that do not exist in nature and must be created in a lab, like THC-O. Also, a synthetic can be a cannabinoid that does exist in nature, but in such minimal amounts that in order to manufacture enough for it to be used in consumer products, it must still be synthesized in a lab, like Delta 8 THC. 

What is THCjd? 

When it comes to some of the newest compounds, like THCjd in particular, there is little to no information available. As a matter of fact, the only bit of info I was able to find, was from manufacturers. I couldn’t find any studies or even press releases about the scientific discovery of this compound.  

That being said, it’s not crazy to think that the companies who are making these products, doing the extractions, and working closely with these compounds don’t have the ability to use their extensive industry knowledge to formulate interesting new cannabinoids, like THCjd. According to some of the companies selling it, “THCjd is a rare, naturally occurring” cannabinoid. But again, I was unable to find any information about it in any type of scientific journal or official literature, in any capacity. Although it’s certainly possible that some of these companies are doing research behind the scenes that the general public doesn’t know about.  

The overall consensus is that THCjd is safe, creates an indica-like, couch lock type of high, and that it’s up to 19x more potent than delta 9 THC. As of now, it’s legal because no laws have been established yet to regulate it. 

Where to get THCjd

If you’re interested in being among the first group of consumers to try THCjd products, then you’re in luck because we have a few deals for you in our newsletter. Again, this is a very new compound so if you choose to buy it, make sure you go with a reputable brand. One of our favorites intro products to THCjd is the new THCjd/THC-H live resin gummies from Delta Extrax (see deal below). Check it out and make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter for more exciting deals.  

Try THCjd Live Resin Gummies for Only $19.49!

(Using ’35testers’ coupon code)

thcjd

An exciting new line of high potency gummies containing some new cannabinoids you’ve likely never heard of (scroll down to learn more about each one). These gummies each contain 125mg of active cannabinoids: Delta 9 THC, THCh, THCjd, THCP, and Live Resin Delta 8 THC. They come in 3 delicious flavors: Purple Berry, Root Beer Float, and Sour Peach.

TIP: Use the ’35testers’ coupon code to try these THCjd live resin gummies for only $19.49  each!

Click here to try the new THCjd live resin gummies!

(Using ’35testers’ coupon code)


If you’re interested in trying out THCjd products, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your top source for all things relating in the cannabis industry, including exclusive deals.  





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FDA Going After Delta-8 Companies

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It was coming. We knew it by Shopify. And whatever happened is probably just the beginning of the story. We know the government isn’t thrilled about the cannabinoid industry, and now its making its first big, direct move, by using the FDA to go after delta-8 THC companies.

The FDA going after delta-8 companies is a predictable move, but who knows how this will end. We specialize in cannabis and psychedelics reporting, which you can follow along with by signing up for the THC Weekly Newsletter. You’ll also get prime access to deals on an array of cannabis products like vapes, edibles, and smoking paraphernalia. Plus, we’ve got tons of cannabinoid compounds like delta-8 THC as well. Please remember, *cannabinoid compounds are not preferred by everyone. We only support people buy products they are comfortable with.


What’s the news?

The CBD industry is already aware of how much the FDA doesn’t like it. The FDA has sent out letters to tons of companies over the years, reminding them about federal laws, and to stop producing and selling products that go against them. For the most part, this hasn’t had the biggest impact, and CBD, which is now cleared for medical use by the UN via updates to the Single Convention, is found pretty much everywhere.

On May 4th, 2022, the FDA made its first big, direct move in the cannabinoid space, by sending out warning letters to delta-8 companies, warning them that the products they are producing and selling, violate federal law. Five companies were targeted thus far, but perhaps more will receive letters in the future. After all, Shopify had to remove a lot of products, and the very same vendors are the targets of such letters.

The companies targeted by the FDA for their delta-8 products, are ATLRx Inc., BioMD Plus LLC, Delta 8 Hemp, Kingdom Harvest LLC, and M Six Labs Inc. These warning letters don’t leave CBD out, making mention of the company violations on that front too. According to Jonathan Havens, co-chair of Saul Ewing Arnstein & Lehr’s Cannabis Law Practice and the Food and Beverage Practice, “the five warning letters represent the first enforcement actions taken by FDA against delta-8 marketers.”

delta-8 thc

Part of the issue has to do with medical claims. According to the government agency, there are no approved drugs that contain delta-8, and so using delta-8 to make any claim for a medication, means making an unapproved claim, for a drug which is also unapproved. The FDA also attacked the idea of the mis-branding of products, with the complaints of not giving good enough instructions, as well as putting delta-8 in food products.

Said FDA Principal Deputy Commissioner, Janet Woodcock, “The FDA is very concerned about the growing popularity of delta-8 THC products being sold online and in stores nationwide… These products often include claims that they treat or alleviate the side effects related to a wide variety of diseases or medical disorders, such as cancer, multiple sclerosis, chronic pain, nausea and anxiety. It is extremely troubling that some of the food products are packaged and labeled in ways that may appeal to children. We will continue to safeguard Americans’ health and safety by monitoring the marketplace and taking action when companies illegally sell products that pose a risk to public health.”

Of course, delta-8 THC has, indeed, been found useful for all the conditions mentioned, which does beg the question of why the government is trying so hard to protect its population from these compounds, especially in light of the no-death count attached. It has repeatedly been shown that additive products are the real main issue, and that cannabis compounds have yet to be associated with death. This is important because another government agency, the CDC, just requested to lower prescribing guidelines for opioids, which already kill as many as 70,000+ a year, even as other non-addictive, no death-toll measures like ketamine and cannabis, exist.

How did this come about?

This newer issue is a counterpart to the CBD issue, which has been going on for awhile now. The cannabinoid industry, led by delta-8 THC, is based on the idea of extracting cannabinoids from the hemp plant for use in products. But there’s a problem with this. Though some of the compounds can technically be extracted from hemp, like delta-8, they can only be extracted in tiny amounts, so that for product production, synthetic processes must be used. This takes these products out from under the definition of hemp, making them federally illegal.

CBD on the other hand, can be extracted in large enough quantities that the same issue of synthetics isn’t relevant. However, neither is cleared by the US federal government for internal use, and the only reason there’s a conversation, is as a result of the 2018 US Farm Bill. The bill instituted a new definition for hemp, in order to promote the industrial hemp industry. In so doing, it separated high-THC cannabis from low-THC cannabis, and defined ‘hemp’ as only certain parts of the actual plant, without including synthetics. It should be noted, however, that even though the US government says CBD is not legal in this way, it did approve epidiolex, a big-pharma synthetic version of CBD. It has also approved synthetic versions of THC (dronabinol).

Synthetics of any Schedule I substance (which are not big-pharma made and approved), are also Schedule I under the Federal Analogue Act. When compounds are made using synthetic processes, or that don’t exist in nature (delta-10), they are not covered under the definition of hemp. Nor is anything (plant or product) that has over .3% delta-9 THC.

hemp

Two of the many issues with the cannabinoid market, are that large amounts of delta-9 THC are often found in products, and that synthetic processing is used to make them. Though the industry uses the term ‘hemp-derived’, this only means that some aspect of it came from the hemp plant, although in reality, even this isn’t necessarily true. As the industry is not regulated, we simply don’t know what we’re buying, and that presents its own problem.

Though regulating the market could settle much of this, the federal government doesn’t want to do that. But it also doesn’t want to lose tax revenue, and that creates a conundrum. The government tends to take money from big pharma, not little mom-and-pop, so anything that can’t be transformed into pharmaceutical profits easily, isn’t desired by the government. It’s just like with Quaaludes, which were too easily made outside of pharma companies, making for a black market that the US couldn’t control.

What else has been done?

The FDA sending warning letters to delta-8 companies is the first big, above-board move by a government agency to try to stop this industry, but it wasn’t the first move made. A couple months ago, the biggest shopping sales platform, Shopify, started sending out its own similar letters, telling vendors they could not sell products with more than .3% delta-9 THC, and that they had to be in general compliance with federal law, which also rules out synthetics. Thus, tons of companies were affected.

Shopify didn’t stop with letters, and immediately forced companies to drop products from their online catalogues, that don’t meet regulation. This most certainly was a hit to the industry, though the lack of overall sales figures in general, makes it hard to know how much. Cannabinoid products are sold all over the place, and show up in a lot of small roadside stores. How much the industry relied on on-line sales, particularly from Shopify, is not clear.

Shopify didn’t make a statement about the US government making it do this. Nor did the US government make a statement about being involved in the Shopify issue. But most companies won’t shoot themselves in the foot if they don’t have to, and it’s hard to believe that Shopify would all of a sudden care about something it never cared about before. This was not an ongoing fight, but a directive that came out of nowhere. It suffices to say there was likely pressure from higher up, and that Shopify itself could have been shut down if it didn’t comply.

Are these products dangerous?

The US government hasn’t legalized cannabis yet, but we already know that that specific legalization is not what determines the safety of the plant. So regardless of whether something is federally illegal or not, whether it’s dangerous or not is an entirely different question. It’s almost joke level funny that Ms. Woodcock would speak about the dangers of compounds with no death toll, while close to 100,000 people die a year from government sanctioned opioids.

opioids

On top of that idea, the US government is getting close to passing a bill to legalize cannabis, whether it wants to call it a ‘legalization’, or a ‘decriminalization’. The MORE Act already passed the House and is now up for the Senate. And if that doesn’t make it, Senate Majority leader Chuck Schumer has his own baby, the Cannabis Administration and Opportunity Act, which he’s carefully shopping around for support, and which hasn’t been officially offered, so as not to run out the clock prematurely.

Though a lot of reasons could be given for why the federal government is working hard now to pass something, one of the biggest reasons is that it must play catch-up with its states, so as not to seem powerless. Legalization measures are moving in only one direction, and its away from federal mandate. Soon enough, more and bigger publications, will point out how few people actually live under federal law concerning cannabis at this point. And as the government can no longer stop this train, it must now get on it, and pretend that was always the goal.

Conclusion

How much of an effect these FDA letters will have on the delta-8 industry is not known, and it might take some time to see results. The US government is obviously frustrated, but it’s also not in a position of power considering failed drug wars, and the lack of danger associated with this particular drug.

Maybe the delt-8 market isn’t the most savory. Maybe there are problems associated. But if the government really wanted to protect its people, it would do something substantial about the opioid epidemic, instead of railing against a plant (or its synthetic counterparts) which doesn’t realistically hurt anyone.

Hi to all! Thanks for joining us at CBDtesters.co, the premiere website for independent coverage of the cannabis and psychedelics industries. Give the site a read-thru frequently to stay on-top of this quickly-changing landscape, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, to keep aware of everything going on.





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Cannabinoids

What Currently Exists and Future Possibilities

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The race to discover and create increasingly potent cannabis compounds is in full swing. This is why we now have so many different versions of THC that manufacturers are beginning to use in their products, and now we’re starting to see a similar trend with the other class of psychoactive cannabinoids: hexahydrocannabinols.  

New cannabinoids and new products are exciting, and we love to cover them all! How many different types of HHC are there? Or will there be? It’s hard to say at the moment. You can follow along by signing up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, which will give you immediate access to offers on cannabis products, including vapes, edibles, and other products. Also, it’ll get you premium access to deals on cannabis flowers, vapes, edibles, and much more! We’ve also got standout offers on cannabinoids, like HHC-O, Delta 8Delta 9 THCDelta-10 THCTHCOTHCVTHCP HHC, which won’t kill your bank account. Head over to our “Best-of” lists to get these deals, and remember to enjoy responsibly!


What is HHC? 

HHC, or hexahydrocannabinol, is a psychoactive compound found in cannabis plants. Although still part of the fringe market, it has been gaining some popularity, as far as alternative cannabinoids go. Regarding HHC research, it’s nearly non-existent. However, both natural and synthetic cannabinoids have been found to suppress tumor growth in numerous different animal studies.   

One study in particular examined the angiogenic effects of several hexahydrocannabinol analogs to see how they can be used in cancer therapies. It was determined that HHC could block the growth of the blood vessels that feed tumors, rather than blocking growth of the tumor itself. So, it basically works as an angiogenesis inhibitor that starves tumors.  

There is a biologically active naturally occurring (−)-hexahydrocannabinol, as well as its synthetic enantiomer (+)-hexahydrocannabinol. The synthetic HHC, which can be found in spice, has the chemical formula: 9-Nor-9β-hydroxyhexahydrocannabinol, and the natural variety, found in trace amounts in cannabis pollen, goes by the formula: 6aR,9R,10aR-Hexahydrocannabinol.   

As the name suggests (Hexahydrocannabinol vs Tetrahydrocannabinol), HHC has many similarities to THC. It’s basically a simplified version of Delta 9 THC. Both HHC and THC have very similar molecular structures and comparable effects. With HHC, all the double bonds have been broken and replaced with hydrogen (AKA hydrogenation). It was discovered during research in the 1960s and 70s in which the goal was to find the most basic cannabinoid-like substances that could still bind to CB receptors. 

High Potency: HHC-O and HHC-P 

As of late, the industry seems hellbent on accessing and synthesizing hundreds of new cannabinoids, both those that have been discovered in the cannabis plant, and various analogues and isomers. HHC, and the possibility of different types of HHC, has recently opened the discussion in some circles regarding the differing chain lengths of HHC, HHCV, HHCB, HHCP, etc. These are the same chain lengths we see in various THCs.

Now, keep in mind that these are all synthetic cannabinoids – but the definition of ‘synthetic cannabinoids’ can mean one of two things. First, synthetic cannabinoids are compounds that do not exist in nature and must be created in a lab, like THC-O. Also, a synthetic can be a cannabinoid that does exist in nature, but in such minimal amounts that in order to manufacture enough for it to be used in consumer products, it must still be synthesized in a lab, like Delta 8 THC. 

HHC-O falls into the first category, while HHC belongs to the second. In cannabis plants, HHC is found in trace amounts in the pollen. HHC-O, on the other hand, is the acetate version of HHC. What about HHC-P, a carbon version of HHC? There is current interest in HHCV, HHCB, HHCP? These are apparently extremely easy to make from their THC counterparts.  

We’re seeing a small influx of new, HHC-P products, hitting the store shelves, but it’s close to impossible to find any information about this cannabinoid that comes from a neutral, fact-based party rather than from the companies who are selling it. It’s likely because, the companies selling the compounds are also the ones who are creating them in the first place, and no one else really knows about these compounds or has had the opportunity to study them yet.  

A bit more on the acetylation of compounds  

HHC-O is created via a process known as LTA decarboxylation. To understand what this means, let’s backtrack a little. We all know about delta 9 THC, the primary psychoactive compound in the plant. Delta 9 THC is a result of the light/heat induced decarboxylation of THCA (tetrahydrocannabinolic acid). Similarly, HHC-O is a result of the decarboxylation of HHC, however, it’s done using a completely different method: LTA decarboxylation.   

LTA decarboxylation uses a very toxic compound known as lead tetraacetate to promote oxidation and create oxidative decarboxylation, resulting in acetate ester. Acetate ester is not naturally occurring and can only be produced using some sort of chemical catalyst. As such, HHC-O-Acetate is a synthetic analogue of HHC. Although it’s gaining popularity, especially in vape products, it’s important to know that this is NOT a compound found naturally in cannabis, it is completely synthetic from all standpoints.   

All this is not to say that synthetics are inherently bad. If they’re safe and produced by an experienced professional, they can be fun and certainly have their place in both medicinal and recreational settings. But you’re definitely not going to get the same kind of high or experience with these products as you would with the real thing. If you know what to expect, you won’t be disappointed though. 

Where to find different HHCs? 

Right now, the best place to find HHC, HHC-O, and possibly HHC-P, is from a trusted online retailer. Even HHC, which has commercially available for about 6 months now, is not as common as other alternatives cannabinoids. As you already know, whenever a new and interesting product hits the market, we’ll be among the first to secure some amazing deals for our readers.  

If you’re interested in trying out HHC/HHCO/HHCP/etc. products, make sure to subscribe to The THC Weekly Newsletter, your top source for all things relating in the cannabis industry, including exclusive deals.  





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Anavii Market

Let’s Grow Weed in Space!

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The world of technology is a wonderful thing, and we already live on a planet filled with amazing accomplishments that we often take for granted. We fly in planes, and drive in cars, and have operations performed with lasers. We can literally grow edible meat in a Petri dish! So, is it that far out to think we might be able to grow weed in space? Think again if it sounds incomprehensible, because the out-of-this-world idea, might become a real thing.

The idea to grow weed in space might sound super far out there, but it’s actually a reality of modern technology. Not only is cannabis researched in space, but whole new ways of growing it have been devised. We cover everything related to the growing industries of cannabis and psychedelics, which you can keep up with by subscribing to THC Weekly Newsletter. You’ll also get direct access to offers on edibles, vapes, and lots of other cannabis paraphernalia, including cannabinoid products. We do remind you, *cannabinoid compounds are not everyone’s first choice. We don’t advise anyone purchase a product they are not comfortable with!


Zero-gravity research?

Since 2017, Kentucky-based start-up company Space Tango has been conducting some pretty interesting research into microgravity. Space Tango is a tech company that develops health and technology products, and does so in space. This means scientists at the International Space Station are able to hold experiments in controlled gravity environments. These experiments are done through inventions like CubeLab, which is a box that allows for experimentation within a controlled environment, and ST-42 which is a “reusable, re-entry free-flying orbital platform” that “utilizes microgravity to manufacture health and technology products…”

According to the company, “Microgravity is a unique attribute of low-Earth orbit, that when utilized as an innovation platform yields solutions that simply do not or cannot exist terrestrially. Microgravity can affect the physical properties of materials and fluids, as well as biological systems.”

It goes on to say: “Coupled with expertise in science and engineering, our capabilities include design, integration, safety and regulatory processes. Space Tango works with partners in the following areas: cell culture, thin film manufacturing, flow chemistry, tissue chips, plant science, and microbiology.”

space station

Can we grow weed in space?

Space Tango has created a way for research to be done in microgravity situations, and one of its uses thus far is with plant science. As of a 2020 writing, Space Tango sent out eight missions, did 88 experiments, and delivered 53 payloads, starting from 2017. One of the lines of research currently under investigation, is growing cannabis in zero-gravity conditions. The goal of said research is to find hemp strands for medical use.

As of the 2020 writing, Space Tango has two micro labs on the International Space Station, which are housed in microwave-sized areas called ‘clean rooms’. The company uses its CubeLab technology to see how cannabis will do in different gravity situations. To get an idea of the popularity of knowing how something will grow in zero-gravity, beer makers Anheuser-Busch sent barley into space to investigate how it grows in near zero-gravity environments, as well.

The beauty of CubeLab technology is that the boxes operate autonomously, allow for near real-time monitoring and data downloads, can be operated from earth, and create mini microgravity chambers that can account for issues of stress to plants, like force and gravity. As THC is globally illegal, it’s not the subject of testing right now, although this will likely change if laws do. Right now, it’s all about hemp.

Space Tango’s main point of study is to see if certain strains grow better without the stress of gravity. Says Dr. Joe Chappell of the Space Tango Science Advisory Team “When plants are ‘stressed,’ they pull from a genetic reservoir to produce compounds that allow them to adapt and survive… Understanding how plants react in an environment where the traditional stress of gravity is removed can provide new insights into how adaptations come about and how researchers might take advantage of such changes for the discovery of new characteristics, traits, biomedical applications and efficacy.”

Space Tango’s own research into zero-gravity cannabis started a few years ago, but the company also works with Atalo Holdings, a provider of hemp genetics, and Anavii Market, an ecommerce site for hemp-derived CBD products. Space Tango set up its research alongside these companies. According to Space Tango co-founder and chairman Kris Kimel in 2020, the company is launching payloads for both corporate and university customers, around six times a year.

Who else is looking to grow weed in space?

Another company coming at it from a different angle is Bioharvest. Bioharvest is a biotechnology company that researches plant cell growth for industry, using liquid bioreactors. According to a Futurism article featuring Chris Hadfield, a retired astronaut hailing from Canada who has spent time on both the ISS (International Space Station) and Mir Space Station, the company is working on creating zero gravity-enhanced nutrients for future astronauts, and is already working with cannabis.

space weed

In fact, Bioharvest has found a way to grow only cannabis trichomes using bioreactors; which means that researchers can now grow just the part of the plant in which cannabinoids are produced. This, according to Hadfield, is “actually replicating the natural growing process of the part that is of use to us but without the whole plant.” It also means getting what’s important without wasting resources like water, or using pesticides.

The company announced in August that it had created a way to make stable coral-like structures containing many trichomes, which could technically change the way cannabis is grown in general. This could mean producing a lot of cannabinoids in less space, and without dealing with the rest of the plant. Sort of in line with growing meat in a Petri dish and not worrying about killing an animal…

Of the technology and legal requirements, CEO Sobel stated that when cannabis is legal throughout the US, the technology they’re working on “may present a breakthrough from a biological science perspective.” He went on to say, “We see the potential ability for valuable minor cannabinoids to be grown at significantly higher quantities compared to its growth on Earth.” This is interesting since the current cannabinoid market operates from synthesizing compounds, due to only tiny amounts naturally produced. Perhaps Bioharvest’s technology could open up a real cannabinoids market, without synthetization.

As it turns out, Bioharvest and Space Tango are working together in order for Bioharvest to “modify its bioreactors for usage in the International Space Station.” This isn’t shocking as Bioharvest created one end of the spectrum, but requires Space Tango’s technology for the ability to test its products in alternate gravity settings.

Are astronauts smoking weed in space?

The answer to that is a hard no. As Hadfield also explained, and which is probably obvious, being in space is not an easy situation, and there are no simple fail-safe measures. Which means if something goes wrong, the small crew is all the small crew has, and the idea of not being in one’s correct mind is not the best idea. As he put it:

“On the space station, if there’s an emergency, you are the fire department. You can’t have intoxicated yourself or inebriated yourself or whatever, just because if something goes wrong, then you’ll die.”

astronauts and weed

Though Hadfield said there is certainly some interest in recreational space cannabis, this isn’t the idea at the moment. Added to that sentiment, Sobel reminded Futurism that “the substance is not yet regulated for the International Space Station.” Chances are, until international policy changes, space will remain THC-free.

For his part, Hadfield pictures a more densely populated space in the future, saying, “Once the population gets large enough, once you get to a stable enough situation, people are gonna want, you know, a drink… People are gonna want some pot.” Right now, however, recreational space weed is still far off. Elon Musk might be planning to sell tickets to Mars, but we’re not at a point for crowds of regular folks to pile on space crafts just yet. Maybe it will happen soon, but maybe it won’t.

Growing marijuana in space might only be for use here on planet earth, but the idea of using the space in space, and the ability for different levels of gravity, does provide an interesting answer for where and how to grow weed. Plus, with the ability to cultivate just trichomes, an entirely new way to grow the plant may become the norm within years.

Conclusion

Technology is truly amazing. Whether talking about boxes to do gravity experimentation in space, or growing just trichomes of the cannabis plant, what humans can accomplish is incredible. While there are certainly many questions that need answers, that we might soon be able to grow weed in space is becoming more of a reality every day.

Of course, if you’re totally cool with the regular thing, and don’t need such dramatics to get high, there are plenty of options on the ground. From standard outside growing, to indoor, to hydroponics, to aeroponics, the average person can grow some pretty decent weed. Prospective growers can choose from a large range of seeds, lights, and other growing equipment to create the perfect growing situation, for earth. I mean, it might not be out-of-this-world, but pretty good stuff is grown right here on this planet!

Welcome readers!! Thanks for stopping by CBDtesters.co/Cannadelics.com, your best source for independent news covering the cannabis and psychedelics fields. Join us regularly to stay current on the exciting universe of cannabis and psychedelics, and sign up for The THC Weekly Newsletter, to ensure you never miss an important story.





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